Underwater Focus & Video Lights

Detailed Overview of Popular Lights for Underwater Photography and Video

By Scott Gietler & Brent Durand

 

felimida macfarlandi nudibranch

 
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Focus lights are different from “aiming” or “modeling” lights. Light & Motion, I-Torch, Fantasea, Nocturnal, Sea & Sea, Princeton Tec, Big Blue and several other companies all manufacture focus lights. There are focus lights available for all budgets, which can double as video lights and vice versa.

 

Why do I really need a focus light?

Focus lights aren't necessary in all situations but are highly recommended. Digital cameras, both compact and DSLR, focus by detecting contrast at the focusing point. Water absorbs light quickly, so using a fous light allows the camera to see the contrast and quickly focus. Using a focus light is critical for shooting at night (it also serves as a primary dive light), for shooting supermacro and oftentimes for shooting macro. Many experienced photographers use focus lights while shooting wide-angle into bright sunlight as well.

Do you need to buy a focus light? Not necessarily... we've seen all of the following solutions:

  • Go without a focus light - many compact users do this, although focusing in low-light may be difficult.
  • Hold a dive light in your hand - easy to do if you can single hand your compact camera, and many people do
  • Mount an inexpensive dive light on your rig with creative DIY methods
  • Use the spotting light of your strobe, but we don't recommend doing this all the time. Strobes should not always be pointed at your subject since doing so causes backscatter.
  • Buy a focus light and mount it on your rig.
  • Use a video light as a focus light.

focus light on underwater camera

 

Will I see the focus light in my images?

Because critters are usually shot at fast shutter speeds and small apertures, the light from a focus light often doesn't show up in a photo. One thing is for sure: you'll have a higher chance of getting a hot spot if you're shooting macro at f/2.8, 1/60th than if you're shooting at f/16, 1/250th. Small apertures and/or fast shutter speeds block out most of the ambient light, including your dive light, especially if you are using the edge of the beam. Strobes provide the light that illuminates your photo subject.

 

Video Lights

Any focus light can be used for video and vice versa. The difference is that while a small, low-lumen light with a narrow beam angle can be used as a focus light, video lights need to have a wider beam angle and high lumen power. The reason is that video shooters want to achieve a wide swath of light that evenly illuminates the foreground or main subject in the image (instead of seeing two "headlights" in every shot).

Divers interested in buying a single light that can double as both focus and video light will want to find a powerful light with several power settings and wide beam angle. This brings the best of both worlds.

 

Which light should I get?

Focus and video lights also differ in their burn time, beam width, size and intensity. The majority of new lights are LED, however several Halogen options are available.

Mounting: Most DSLR and Mirrorless underwater photogaphers mount a focus light on top of their housing via a cold shoe mount. This allows some flexibility in light positioning for different compositions. Compact users often do the same or use a "triple clamp: to attach a focus light at the first junction of their strobe arms. This doesn't allow as much flexibility in positionsing, but is an efficient way to safely mount a focus light on your rig. Hand-holding is the last (and least desirable) option.

Additional considerations before purchasing a focus/video light are budget and intended use. Will you be using the light solely for focusing during daytime? If you do night dive, then this light will probably become your primary dive light as well, and you should look for one with plenty of lumens. If you plan to shoot video, you'll need to consider whether the light has a "hot spot" in the center of the beam and beam width in additon to lumens. An obvious fact is that longer burn times are better than short ones, and that lights with multiple power settings help lengthen burn times.

Below are some of our favorite options:

 

Light & Motion

Sola Photo 500, 800 & 1200:

Sola Photo lights are very popular for their small size, light weight and easy operation between various power levels. They also feature a rechargable integrated battery, meaning no more fuss with o-rings! Sola lights offer several mounting options in order to fit your camera system. The 1200 is a powerful light, with 1200 lumens and a red light to help sneak up on shy critters (many marine creatures cannot see red light). The Sola 800 is 800 lumens with a red light, and the 500 is 500 lumens without a red light. All of these models are flood lights, not spot lights - ideal for underwater photographers. All Sola lights easily flip between 3 different power settings for white light and red light (depending on model). Burn time is about an hour on full power.

sola light

Light & Motion SOLA 1200 with red light mode.

Sola Dive 500, 800 & 1200

Sola Dive lights are similar to the Photo lights, however do not have a red light. The benefit for diving is that they offer both spot and flood lights. Flood lights provide a great wide-angle beam (perfect getting up close with a subject), while the spot light is ideal for swimming and seeing farther at night. These lights come with a wrist mount, however are adaptable with any other Sola mount.

 

Sola Video 1200, 2000, 2000 S/F, 4000

Sola Video lights are similar to the Photo and Dive models, but pack many more lumens needed for capturing vivid, colorful video. At the 2000 lumen level, Light & Motion offers a flood and a flood/spot light version. Mount a couple 4000s on your rig and watch the reef errupt color in front of you!

sola video light

Light & Motion SOLA Video 2000.

 

Light & Motion GoBe Light

The GoBe has many benefits. Aside from being affordable, is it very lightweight and can be used as a dive light, focus light, red focus light, fluoro diving light, bicycle light and countless other topside activities. The fact that you can change lightheads (above water) makes it a great light for newer divers/photographers who will slowly add more heads and also for more seasoned divers/photographers wanting light for a specific application.

Read our detailed GoBe Light Review.

  

Light & Motion GoBe light.

 

I-Torch

I-Torch Video Pro7

I-Torch creates powerful lights in compact aluminum housings. The new Pro7 video light is a great option as a focus light and excels for underwater video, featuring 5000 lumens, 120 degree beam angle, 5 power modes, battery power level indicator and other great features.

Read Bluewater Photo's I-Torch Video Pro7 Review.

I-Torch Pro7 light.

I-Torch Video Pro6

The Pro6 boasts 2400 lumens and a very wide beam angle. The Pro6 has combined popular features from many lights into one compact unit. There are 4 power levels for the white beam, two for the red beam and a UV (ultraviolet) light. The modes are accessed through a button on the top of the light right where the mount is. A power indicator light is also built into the switch and glows green, orange or red. The Pro6 takes one rechargeable lithium battery but comes with two so that one will always be charged. Burn time is one hour on full power.

Read our I-Torch Video Pro6 Review.

i-torch pro6 light

i-torch Pro6 Video & Focus Light.

 

I-Torch Video Pro5

The Pro5 is a 1600 lumen video and focus light that delivers an even 110-degree beam at a great price. Light in weight and compact, the Pro5 has two power modes (100% & 50%) that are turned on by twisting the head of the light. The Pro5 takes 2 rechargeable lithium batteries with burn time dependent on power setting. The light comes with 4 batteries, so you can use a set all day as a focus light, then put in a fresh set for a night dive. Burn time is about an hour on full power.

 

 

Ikelite

Gamma

The Gamma features a precision-machined aluminum body that boats over 220 lumens. The compact focus/dive light is depth-rated to 400ft (120m) and features a heavy-duty mechanical tail switch that provides either continuous or momentary lighting at the touch of a button. The Ikelite Gamma takes 2 rechargeable batteries and comes in red, black or silver. Burn time is 10 hours.

ikelite gamma light

Ikelite's Gamma light.

 

Light Tests & Comparisons

Sola Lights Review

I-Torch Pro6 Video/Focus Light Review

Light & Motion GoBe Light Review

I-Torch Video Pro7 Review 

 

 

In Conclusion

There are many great light options available these days, whether you’re upgrading focus/video lights or looking to purchase your first. One thing is for certain – all serious underwater photographers and videographers need to have at least one light.

 

This photo of a blue-ring topsnail was taken using the red "stealth" mode on the SOLA 600. Attempts to take the picture using white focus light only caused the snail to retreat into its shell. Photo by Michael Zeigler.

 

 

Further Reading

 


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