Stacking 2 Inon 165mm lens

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Postby Jasoncassanova » Thu Jan 27, 2011 9:26 pm

After purchasing my first Inon 165mm macro lens and taking it underwater, I went back to my supplier and purchased another one :D hoping that I will get more better photos, was hoping if you guys can teach me techniques on how to shoot with two macro lenses. Also, will stacking three lenses practical?
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Postby bvanant » Fri Jan 28, 2011 5:26 pm

Two lenses are practical but the DOF will suffer a bit as will optical quality. Adding a third lens doesn't get you to a place where you can actually get pictures. Shooting supermacro is fun but you need to find the right shot/place and take lots of repetitions of the shots.
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Postby Jasoncassanova » Sat Jan 29, 2011 1:15 pm

thanks bill :)
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Postby jlyle » Sun Jan 30, 2011 1:20 pm

Jason,

I don't know what you are shooting, but I used stacked 165s in olden times with an Oly c5050. Use the smallest aperture you can (remember small aperture = larger f-stop!) The trick is to keep the camera in macro mode (not supermacro). Move the rig towards the subject until the image on the screen starts to appear before pressing the shutter button for auto-focus. Like Bill says, the DOF is very, very narrow (credit card thin). You should take lots of pictures in hopes of keeping one or two. When they work, stacked macro lens adapters are great, but they can be tricky to use. You are going to have to get very, very close to the subject, so stacked macros are better with non-skittish critters.

Image

Image
DSDO (dive safely, dive often),
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Postby scottg » Sun Feb 06, 2011 4:17 pm

Jason, this article on shooting supermacro underwater with a wet diopter should be helpful


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Postby Jasoncassanova » Tue Feb 08, 2011 11:04 pm

Jlyle,

thanks :) I am using a G11 in an Ikelite housing, I still haven't taken the two lens stacked together underwater but I did a mock underwater night dive inside my room at 3am, using one Ikelite DS-160 strobe and three underwater creature models, this is what I got....

http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/albu ... aid=321955

Jason.

p.s. feel free to comment :) he he he

jlyle wrote:Jason,

I don't know what you are shooting, but I used stacked 165s in olden times with an Oly c5050. Use the smallest aperture you can (remember small aperture = larger f-stop!) The trick is to keep the camera in macro mode (not supermacro). Move the rig towards the subject until the image on the screen starts to appear before pressing the shutter button for auto-focus. Like Bill says, the DOF is very, very narrow (credit card thin). You should take lots of pictures in hopes of keeping one or two. When they work, stacked macro lens adapters are great, but they can be tricky to use. You are going to have to get very, very close to the subject, so stacked macros are better with non-skittish critters.

Image

Image
"Beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder..."
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Postby Jasoncassanova » Tue Feb 08, 2011 11:07 pm

Scott,

thanks! I enjoyed reading it :)

Jason.

scottg wrote:Jason, this article on shooting supermacro underwater with a wet diopter should be helpful


Scott
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Postby jlyle » Fri Feb 11, 2011 8:43 am

Jason,

Nice shots. One more thing, once underwater you need to burp the stacked lenses to get air out. It's heart-stopping to look at the LCD and see a water/air line!
DSDO (dive safely, dive often),
Jim

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