New Technique: Shooting Blind

Scott Gietler
Capture the Shots you Never Could with this Innovative Technique

 

New Technique: Shooting Blind


Capture the Shots you Never Could with this Innovative Technique

Text and Photos By Scott Gietler

 

 

 
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Shooting blind is my new technique for capturing photos you never could have otherwise - like speeding sea lions or a fast-moving bait ball. I highly doubt that I invented this technique, but I haven't ever seen anything written about it, so I thought I would share it with all of you.

I showed this technique to my students at Bluewater Photo's recent La Paz workshop and everyone got some great photos, so now it's time to share it with you, on the Underwater Photography Guide.

 

shooting blind - underwater photography technique
Blue shark and divers, in Southern California, shot blind leaning camera back for sun rays

 

The concept is quite simple, and some of you may have tried it before. If you are using a dSLR with a fisheye lens or wide-angle lens, and are used to shooting through the viewfinder, you simply push your rig out towards the subject with your arms extended, point the rig at a slight upwards angle, and take the photo without shooting through the viewfinder.  I'll often take several shots at slightly different angles.

This allows the camera to get much closer to a subject like a sea lion, shark or baitball then you normally would, and it also allows for a better upward angle than you could get keeping your eye on the viewfinder. It takes a little practise to be able to compose correctly, but it is not that difficult to learn.

 

Demonstation of shooting blind underwater

 

 

Blind Shooting Underwater Photos

 

Baitball shot with the blind shooting technique.

 

Selfie in a bait ball shot with the blind shooting technique.

 

Huge bait ball in La Paz.

 

A school of fish swims away under a sunburst. By pushing my rig forward and shooting blind, I was able to get the rig under the fish and shoot upwards, getting the sun in the photo.

 

My dive buddy engulfed in a bait ball. Shooting blind allowed me to get a better upward angle on this shot, than if I had kept my eye on the viewfinder.

 

 

 

Further Reading

 

 

About the Author

Scott Gietler is the owner of Bluewater Photo, Bluewater Travel and the Underwater Photography Guide. He enjoys helping others learn underwater photography online, in the store and during international photo trips he attends with customers.

 

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Underwater Settings for Sony RX100 II & III

Brent Durand
Best Settings for Macro and Wide-Angle Underwater Photo and Video

 

Underwater Settings for Sony RX100 II and RX100 III


Best Settings for Macro and Wide-Angle Underwater Photo and Video

By Brent Durand

 

Sony RX-100 III Underwater Settings

 

 
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The Sony Cyber-shot RX100 line of cameras is one of the most popular options for underwater photographers looking for the balance between great photo and video, price, size and ease of use.

The RX100 cameras excel past the compact camera market because of their larger sensors and resulting image quality. Recording Full HD video is easy with the press of a button no matter what still photo mode you're using. Full manual control allows experienced underwater photographers to capture the image they imagine, while auto settings deliver fantastic results for more casual shooters.

In this article we are not reviewing the cameras, but sharing the best settings for the RX100 II and RX100 III for underwater photo and video.

 

For a detailed reviews and specs, see our articles:

 

sony rx-100 III underwater photos

In the pool with a water gun. Sony RX-100 III, Recsea RX-100 III housing, ambient light. F8, 1/400th, ISO 400. Photo: Scott Gietler.

 

Best Macro Settings

The Sony RX100 II and RX100 III shoot fantastic macro photos. For the best results try shooting in Manual mode:

  • F8
  • 1/500s
  • ISO 80 (100 on RX100 II)

Make sure you are zoomed out all the way for best focusing and image quality. If using a strobe, Auto White Balance delivers accurate color balance - just remember to set the internal flash to forced flash mode and your strobe to TTL (or manual if you're comfortable with more adjustments.

Remember that shooting at an aperture of F8 will allow for much of the subject to be in focus. You can also experiement with opening the aperture down to F2.8 for a shallow depth of field.

 

Macro Wet Diopter

For shooting very small subject, make sure you have a wet diopter. We recommend the Bluewater +7 macro diopter, as it is lightweight, small and very affordable. It has 67mm threaded mount that will work with all RX100 II and RX100 III underwater housings.

When shooting with a macro diopter, you will want to zoom in to create as much magnification as possible of the subject. Because of the increased magnification, stop down the aperture to create more depth of field. Our recommended settings are:

  • F11
  • 1/500s
  • ISO 80 (100 on RX100 II)

We also recommend using a focus light for macro shooting with a diopter. This will allow your camera to lock focus and focus faster in a dark shooting environment (like we have underwater).

 

 

Best Wide-Angle Settings

Wide-angle shooting with the RX100 III and RX100 II is a lot of fun! We recommend the following settings for Manual mode shooting:

  • F6.3
  • 1/125s
  • ISO 80 (100 on RX100 II)

Make sure you are zoomed out all the way in order to bring as much of the scene into the frame as possible. If your image is too dark or too bright, simply adjust the shutter speed up or down accordingly. If using a strobe, Auto White Balance delivers accurate color balance - just remember to set the internal flash to forced flash mode and your strobe to TTL (or manual if you're comfortable with more adjustments.

For shooting wide-angle into the sun (as you would for a sunburst or silhouette), stop down the aperture to F11 and/or increase your shutter speed to 1/1000s or faster. This will decrease the light entering the camera and help freeze the water to capture stunning sun rays.

 

Wide-Angle Wet Lenses

One of the keys to good underwater photography is getting close to your subject. For small macro subjects that's easy, but for large wide-angle subjects you won't be able to fit the subject into the frame. As a result, photographers need to use a fisheye or wide-angle lens.

For the Sony RX100 III and RX100 II we find the best results with the Bluewater WA-100 Wide-Angle Lens and the Dyron Super Wide-Angle Lens. This is a wet diopter that attaches to the outside of your housing, and expands the field of view so that you can capture great wide-angle perspectives.

 

sony rx-100 III underwater photos

Shark in St. Maarten. Sony RX100 III, Nauticam RX100 III housing, SeaLife Sea Dragon strobe on automatic, F4, 1/250. Photo: Caryn Bing

 

Sony RX100 II Sample Underwater Photo

Recsea RX100 II with Bluewater WA-110 wide-angle lens. Cenotes, Mexico. Photo: Shingo Ishida

 

Sony RX-100M2 underwater photo

Sony RX100 II, F3.2, 1/160. Shot using UWL-04 Fisheye Lens. Photo: Jeremy Hicks

 

Sony RX-100M2 underwater photo

Sony RX100 II, F4.5, 1/320. Shot using UWL-04 Fisheye Lens. Photo: Jeremy Hicks

 

 

Best Video Settings

The Technical Stuff:

The RX100 III received some serious video upgrades from the RX100 II. In simplest terms, video recorded on the new model is of much higher quality with a faster processor and new codec system (XAVC S). So what's the real difference? Basically you can record more data for a higher image quality, as well as faster frame rates at 1080p, which is very nice for creating slow motion in your videos (sharks, bait balls, sea lions, etc). Note that if you plan to use this XAVC S codec, you will need beefy SDXC memory cards that can handle the data.

 

Video Settings:

For the best balance between video quality and frame rate, we recommend the following settings for full HD video.

  • File Format:  AVCHD
    • Set this:  At the bottom of the 1st camera menu.
  • Record Setting:  60p 28M (PS)
    • Set this: At the top of the 2nd camera menu.

 

Another shot from the pool - Sony RX100 III, Recsea RX100 III housing, ambient light.

 

 

Critical Menu Settings

The most important menu setting is to make sure the AF Illuminator is turned off (see Menu 4 below), otherwise your camera will have trouble focusing once inside the underwater housing.

The settings below are in the main camera menu of the RX100 III (1st menu group with camera icon), but are very similar with the RX100 II.

 

 

Menu 1

  • Image Size:  L:20M
    • The highest resolution JPEG setting
  • Aspect Ratio:  3:2
    • Standard film aspect ratio - convenient when you want to print and frame your images in standard-cut mats.
  • Quality:  RAW & JPEG
    • This is Scott Gietler's favorite setting, since you can get the JPG files online asap but also have RAW files for editing.
  • File Format:  AVCHD
    • This is for video only.

 

Sony RX-100 III Menu Settings

 

Menu 2

  • Record Setting:  60p 28M(PS)
    • This is for video only.
  • Dual Video REC:  Off
    • This is practical for those interested in sharing video via WiFi.
  • Drive Mode:  Single Shooting
    • The only time you would use Continuos shooting would be fast action without any strobes/flash.
  • Flash Mode:  Fill-flash
    • This fires the flash at a low power level, allowing it to recycle faster for the next shot and also save camera battery.
  • Flash Comp:  +0.0
    • This can be reduced (-1, -2 or -3) as long as your strobes are still triggered by the flash output. This will allow the flash to recyle faster for the next shot and also save camera battery.
  • Red Eye Reduction:  Off
    • This is not needed underwater.

 

Sony RX-100 III Menu Settings

 

Menu 3

  • Focus Mode:  Continuous AF
    • The focus will constantly evaluate itself, adjusting to movements of the camera and/or subject.
  • Focus Area:  Flexible Spot
    • Allows full movement of the focus point, which is ideal for focusing on an eye or nudibranch rhinophore.
  • AF Illuminator:  Off
    • This must be turned off or it may interfere with camera focusing inside the housing.
  • Exposure Comp:  +0.0
    • Used to adjust the camera's metering when shooting in Aperture Priority or Shutter Priority modes.
  • ISO:  80
    • Higher ISOs result in more noise, or grain, in the images, so it's good practice to keep ISO as low as possible.
  • ND Filter:  Off
    • This is not used except in some advanced underwater shooting techniques.

 

Sony RX-100 III Menu Settings

 

Menu 4

  • Metering Mode:  Center
    • This is generally where your subject will lie. For vast wide-angle scenes this can be changed to Multi.
  • White Balance:  Auto
    • AWB works great, especially with strobes and/or video lights.
  • DRO / Auto HDR:  Off
    • This is not used underwater.
  • Creative Style:  Standard
    • This setting delivers standard color balance, saturation, etc in your JPEG files.

 

Sony RX-100 III Menu Settings

 

Menu 5

  • Long Exposure NR:  On
    • This setting is used or exposures over 1/3s, so leave it on since it won't affect underwater images since you're using a faster shutter speed.
  • High ISO NR:  Normal
    • This reduces the graininess in an image when shooting at a high ISO.
  • Center Lock-on AF:  On
    • Tracks a subject as it moves through the frame.
  • Smile / Face Detect.:  Off
    • This is not needed underwater.
  • Soft Skin Effect:  Off
    • This is not needed underwater.

 

Sony RX-100 III Menu Settings

 

Menu 6

  • SteadyShot:  On
    • Helps eliminate camera shake.
  • SteadyShot:  Active
    • Helps eliminate camera shake.
  • Color Space:  sRGB
    • Unless you plan to edit RAW files in software that allows you to record/edit in AdobeRGB then export as sRGB, leave this as sRGB. Learn more about Color Space.
  • Auto Slow Shut.:  On
    • When shooting in Manual mode, this will not be affected as you control the shutter speed. The only time you will want to turn this off is shooting fast-moving subjects in low light.

 

Sony RX-100 III Menu Settings

 

Menu 7

  • Audio Recording:  On
    • We like sound in video!
  • Micref Level:  Normal
    • This setting is only changed for specific situations (i.e. sound at loud concerts).
  • Wind Noise Reduct.:  Off
    • This is not needed underwater.

 

Sony RX-100 III Menu Settings

 

Other Menus

In the Settings menu (icon of a wheel), we prefer a 2 second Focus Magnification Time and 2 second auto Review time.

 

Having fun swimming - Sony RX100 III, Recsea RX100 III housing, ambient light.

 

 

Recommended Memory Card

We recommend a memory card that is Class 10 or higher. For those who want to use the highest quality video, be sure to use an SDXC card.

Bluewater Photo sells a number of Delkin SD Memory Cards.

 

 

Underwater Housings

The quality of the Sony RX100 III and RX100 II is matched with high quality housings that allow access to all the important camera controls. 

Choosing the perfect housing for your style of diving and budget can be a daunting task, but made inifinitely easier by speaking to experts who have used all the housings. Contact the team at Bluewater Photo for expert advice on choosing the right housing for you.

Also, check out the reviews and Bluewater Photo product pages below:

 

Recsea

 

Nauticam

 

Acquapazza

 

Ikelite

 

Fantasea

 

 

RENT the RX100 III & RX100 II with HOUSING:

Bluewater Photo offers RX100 III and RX100 II camera and housing rentals. Email them or call at +1 (310) 633-5052.

 

 

 

Further Reading

 

 

About the Author

Brent Durand is an avid California beach diver, photographer and writer dedicated to capturing unique underwater, ocean lifestyle and adventure images. Brent is editor of the Underwater Photography Guide. Follow UWPG on Facebook for daily photos, tips & everything underwater photography!

 

Support the Underwater Photography Guide:


The Best Service & Prices on u/w Photo Gear

 

Visit Bluewater Photo & Video for all your underwater photography and video gear. Click, or call the team at (310) 633-5052 for expert advice!

 


The Best Pricing, Service & Expert Advice to Book your Dive Trips

 

Bluewater Travel is your full-service scuba travel agency. Let our expert advisers plan and book your next dive vacation. Run by divers, for divers.

 


 

 
 
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Whale Shark Photo & Video Tips

Brent Durand
Whale Shark underwater photo & video tips, techniques and best settings for DSLR, Mirrorless, Compact and GoPro cameras.

 

Whale Shark Underwater Photo & Video Tips

Tips, Techniques & Best Settings for Swimming with Whale Sharks
 

By Brent Durand
Photos by Scott Gietler & Vijay Raman

 

 

 
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Swimming with whale sharks is a special experience - one that can be a relaxing swim, a heart-pounding adventure surrounded by the largest fish in the ocean or a heart-pounding workout swim alongside one of these massive fish.

Divers can swim with whale sharks around the world, inlcuding destinations like Mexico's Sea of Cortez and Isla Mujeres, Ecuador's Galapagos Islands, Honduras' Utila, the Philippines' Cebu, Indonesia's Cenderawasih Bay and several other dive locations.

UWPG publisher Scott Gietler and co-trip leader Vijay Raman recently returned from Bluewater Photo's La Paz workshop with some amazing images, so let's explore some of the photo techniques they used to capture these images as well as some tips for those shooting video.

 

1.  Use a Fisheye Lens

Whale sharks are large - actually the largest fish in the ocean! You'll want to be close to the subject in order to capture as much detail as possible, and this means using a lens with wide field of view. Of course, if the whale sharks are swimming they could change direction at any moment, so pay very close attention to their movement to avoid touching them or being run over.

 

DSLR

Fisheye lenses like the Tokina 10-17mm will be the most popular, especially on crop sensor cameras. Full frame shooters can use the Tokina or look into the Sigma 15mm or the Canon 8-15 circular fisheye

 

MIRRORLESS

Underwater photographers using Olympus E-PL and OM-D cameras will opt for the popular Panasonic 8mm fisheye lens. This lens is our top recomendation for wide-angle shooting on mirrorless cameras.

 

COMPACT CAMERAS

Compact camera users will want to shoot whale shark photos with a wide-angle wet lens that mounts to their housing port. Our top recommendation is the UWL-04 fisheye lens. Remember that once you put the camera and lens in the water, remove the lens to "burp" out the bubbles trapped between the front of the housing port and the wet lens. Otherwise, you'll see these bubbles in all of your photos.

 

GOPRO

GoPro shooters, whether using the Hero 3, Hero 3+ or Hero4 will be able to record great underwater photo and video of whale sharks without any additional lenses. Since you'll be swimming on the surface with the whale sharks as they feed, no GoPro filters are needed. many find that using a selfie pole can help produce great photo and video. We recommend the SeaLife Aquapod telescoping monopod.

 

A fisheye lens on crop sensor DSLR allowed Vijay to get close to the whale shark without cutting off the tail of the big fish.

 

2.  Use Time Value Exposure

DSLR, Mirrorless and Compact shooters have a number of shooting mode options to choose from. We recommend using time value and closely monitoring your exposure meter before snapping each shot.

When shooting whale shark photos, you have more leeway with a variable aperture. For example, you might not notice much difference between f2.8 and f4 (compact) or f4 and f5.6 (dslr). But if shooting in aperture value you will notice the difference between a shutter speed of 1/15 and 1/30.

Of course, shooting manual is an option, especially with variable ISO (DSLRs that can handle higher ISOs). Just know that the light changes with every repositioning of the camera!

 

This whale shark was captured in sharp detail by ensuring a shutter speed fast enough to freeze the action.

 

3.  Shoot in Ambient Light

When swimming with whale sharks, you will want to be as mobile and nimble as possible. And, since the whale sharks are feeding at the surface you can shoot entirely with ambient light. So leave the strobes and video lights on the boat or at the resort. You'll be able to swim faster, maneuver more quickly and have less settings to worry about.

 

Sun rays penetrate the water, lighting up the whale shark and creating a reflection on the surface. No strobes or video lights needed.

 

4.  Position Yourself Away from Others

One of the keys to good underwater photo composition is to eliminate distracting elements from the frame. If you're on a boat with a few other divers, make sure to position yourself so that all your dive buddies are not in the background. Sometimes, this can make very cool photos, but more often than not, your whale shark will look like it has arms and legs growing out of its head.

 

A perfect example of great framing of a swimmer and whale shark. If the swimmer had been cut off by the whale shark (both shapes merged), the scene would leave the viewer feeling unsettled.

 

 

4.  Remember to Shoot Silhouettes

Shooting sideways and down onto whale sharks in ambient light creates beautiful photos, but so does shooting up at the whale sharks. Not only can you create beautiful silhouettes, but you can create nice sunbursts as well.

To capture a sunburst like this, make sure to stop down your aperture (f8 on compact, f18 on mirrorless, f22 on DSLR) and use a fast shutter speed.

 

Shooting up can help create beautiful silhouettes and sunbursts.

 

 

Further Reading

 

 

Support the Underwater Photography Guide:


The Best Service & Prices on u/w Photo Gear

 

Visit Bluewater Photo & Video for all your underwater photography and video gear. Click, or call the team at (310) 633-5052 for expert advice!

 


The Best Pricing, Service & Expert Advice to Book your Dive Trips

 

Bluewater Travel is your full-service scuba travel agency. Let our expert advisers plan and book your next dive vacation. Run by divers, for divers.

 


 

 
 
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10 Essential Ambient Light U/W Photo Tips

Scott Gietler
Ten shooting techniques you need to know in shallow water or when shooting without strobes

 

10 Essential Ambient Light Underwater Photo Tips


Ten Shooting Techniques you Need to Know When Shooting Without Strobes

Text and Photos By Scott Gietler

 

 

 
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Shooting underwater photos with ambient light is a great way to add variety to your portfolio, whether it's sharks, split-shots (aka over-unders) or silhouettes. I recently spent some time shooting ambient light in Kona, Hawaii and Fakarava, French Polynesia and put together some essential tips to get incredible shots next time you're in the water without strobes.

 

The Essential Tips:

 

1 - Get a Big Dome for over/unders

It is much easier to compose and shoot split-shots with a larger dome port. Remember to shoot over/under shots on sunny days. Shoot at a small F-stop. Read more over-under split shot tips.


Photo from Fakarava, French Polynesia, with 8-inch dome port, Tokina 10-17mm lens

 

 

2 - Test your Exposures

Make sure to use exposure compensation to nail the exposure just right without over or under exposing. Take some test shots before the money shot appears in front of you.


Oceanic whitetip shark from Kona, Hawaii with Tokina 10-17mm fisheye lens.

 

 

3 - Shoot with the Sun Behind You

The sun will light up the scene if the sun is behind you, eliminating dark shadows and bringing more color into the scene.

 

 

4 - Use Lightroom to Add Color and Contrast

Also be sure to check out my article 'Lightroom for the Rest of Us'. In this example, the color temp was warmed up, the contrast, clarity and vibrance increased and the blacks adjusted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 - Shoot with the Sun in Front of You for rays

When the sun is in front of you and directly overhead (mid-day), you can capture incredible sun-rays.

 

 

6 - Try Black and White Conversions

Many ambient light photos look great in black and white, so try converting your shots to see how they look. These Pilot whales from Kona, Hawaii looks great in black & white.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 - Shooting Directly Up for Silhouettes

Make sure your subject is underexposed to avoid "light leakage" (silvertip siulhouette)


Silvertip shark from Fakarava, French Polynesia

 

 

8 - Get Close to your Subject

Getting close will bring out the best possible color in your photos. Notice how the corals in the background are blue, even though they are at the same depth as the corals in the foreground.

 

9 - Shoot a Reef that is Equidistant to the Camera

For great colors throughout the photo, shoot a reef that is equidistant to the camera. This is the best way to avoid the color from being absorbed by the water as distance increases.


Coral reef at Kirby's, Anilao, Philippines

 

 

10 - Shoot at or Near the Surface

This provides the best light and color since there is less water it must penetrate.

 

 

 

About the Author

Scott Gietler is the owner of Bluewater Photo, Bluewater Travel and the Underwater Photography Guide. He enjoys helping others learn underwater photography online, in the store and during international photo trips he attends with customers.

 

Further Reading

 


Where to Buy

Please support the Underwater Photography Guide by purchasing your underwater photography gear through our sister site, Bluewater Photo & Video. Click, or call them at (310) 633-5052 for expert advice!


 

 
 
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3 Quick Tips for Dive Buddy Photos

Brent Durand
Diver in Scene Photo Essay written on Location in Tulamben, Bali

 

3 Quick Tips for Dive Buddy Photos


Diver in Scene Photo Essay written on Location in Tulamben, Bali

Text and Photos By Brent Durand

 

Diver in Scene

 

 
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As underwater photographers we like nothing more than sharing photos of what we’ve seen underwater. But at some point, our audience will stifle a yawn on during fish portrait #26. So how do we keep it interesting?

Answer:  Show them photos of you and your dive buddy in action! 

 

Dive Buddy Photo Tips

1) Try close-focus-wide-angle

Find an interesting foreground element that has negative space behind it. The key to a successful CFWA shot is depth. Not only does your dive buddy keep an eye on you underwater, but they are a mobile “depth-creation tool.” Make sure they’re ok being a dive model (prior to the dive), and then use them to fill in that negative space of you CFWA composition. Remember that you’ll need to return the favor if you’re both photographers.

 

Diver in Scene

 

2) Look at the camera or don’t look at the camera.

If you’re shooting close-focus wide-angle, then your buddy should be looking towards the foreground subject. But if you’re shooting your dive buddy in open water, ask them to look directly into the camera, since eye contact helps create a more intimate portrait.

 

Diver in Scene

 

3) Be prepared before working with your buddy.

Be sure to set up your shot before you ask you buddy to model. This way you can focus on working with them instead of the composition and lighting.

 

Diver in Scene

 

I’ve been using these tips with Quinn here in Bali, Indonesia during the 1st leg of our Best of Southeast Asia tour – visiting 14 dive resorts over 8-weeks. Follow our blog for photo essays, travel tips, insider resort reports and our video series (giving you an inside look at each dive resort). Visit the Best of Southeast Asia website.

 

Diver in Scene

 

About the Author

Best of Southeast Asia

Brent Durand is an avid California beach diver, photographer and writer dedicated to capturing unique underwater, ocean lifestyle and adventure images. Brent is editor of the Underwater Photography Guide. Brent will be leading an epic 14-resort Best of SouthEast Asia tour with daily photo and video updates from Aug 16th - Oct 16th 2014.

 

Further Reading

 


Where to Buy

Please support the Underwater Photography Guide by purchasing your underwater photography gear through our sister site, Bluewater Photo & Video. Click, or call them at (310) 633-5052 for expert advice!


 

 
 
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Beginner's Guide to GoPro for Underwater Video

Brent Durand
Settings, Filters, Lights, Shooting Tips, Editing & more

 

Beginner's Guide to GoPro for Underwater Video


Settings, Filters, Lights, Shooting Tips, Editing & More

 By Brent Durand

 

GoPro Hero 3+ Underwater Video Tips

 

 
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GoPro video cameras have become incredibly popular with divers over the last two years, set up in a variety of ways to capture fleeting moments underwater. Pole cams, selfie poles, housing mounts, handles, trigger grips, dome ports, tray/arm setups, mask mounts, spear gun mounts and all sorts of other accessories are allowing divers to capture their underwater visions and share them online.

Let’s take a look at the basic functions of the GoPro Hero cameras and how to capture beautiful underwater video.

 

How do I Start Shooting Underwater Video?

You can shoot video with your GoPro almost right out of the box. Once you win the battle through the theft-resistant packaging, the first step is to charge the battery. This is done by inserting the battery into the camera and then connecting the camera to a USB plug via the supplied cable.

The camera is fully charged once the red charging light goes off. Insert the camera into the housing while paying special attention not to have any hair, lint, dust, sand or other debris on the housing’s white O-ring on the back cover or the notch it fits into on the housing. The housing will flood and drown the camera if this seal is dirty!

Turn the camera on by holding the front button for two seconds and begin recording video by pushing the top button. Stop recording with the same button. Small red LED lights will flash on front and back of the housing while actively recording. Note that the Hero 3 will turn on after depressing the button for two seconds but that you need to release the button on the Hero 3+ after two seconds for it to turn on.

While there is no screen on the Hero 3+, the camera shoots with a very wide perspective and you’ll capture your subject as long as the camera is pointed accurately. Alternatively, you could purchase the GoPro LCD Touch Bacpac. The Bacpac will let you see what you're filming, however it will drain the battery quickly.

 

What Video Resolution do I use?

The GoPro Hero 3+ default is set to 1080p SuperView 30fps. If this is your first time shooting video, know that this is great HD resolution / frame rate and you’re good to go. More advanced users will experiment with the video settings, perhaps choosing 60fps or even faster frame rates in order to slow these down in post processing for smooth slow motion scenes.

One thing to keep in mind is that the higher resolution and framerate, the more demands you will be placing on your computer for editing. Make sure not to record 4k video for your entire trip only to learn that your laptop doesn’t have the processing power to work with the footage!

 

GoPro Studio for Underwater Video

Tutorial:  Editing underwater video with GoPro Studio 2.0.

 

When do I use a Red or Magenta Filter?

Filters are used in underwater video to bring red light back into the picture, providing more color and contrast for the scene. Red filters bring the red color back into blue water while magenta filters are for green water.

To learn the specifics of using filters on the GoPro Hero 3 and Hero 3+, check out our GoPro Underwater Filters article.

 

When do I use a Video Light and how do I Attach it?

A video light(s) is also used to bring color and contrast into underwater scenes. These lights, some of which are very powerful, can only reach a few feet, so they’re best used with a prominent subject close to the camera (a reef, school of fish, shark, coral, etc.).

To mount video lights, GoPro shooters must first purchase a tray and handles for their housing. The lights will attach to the ends of these handles either directly or with arm extensions and clamps.

Learn more about lights for underwater video.

 

How do I Create a Time-lapse for my Dive Video?

I frequently hear folks asking how to make a time-lapse video in their GoPro. While this software update is probably not very far off, it’s just not possible today. Time-lapse video must be created during post processing.

The most popular way to do this is by recording a series of images with the interval timer (4th mode with picture of a camera and clock). Your GoPro Hero 3+ has several different interval settings accessed via the settings menu, and each will be useful for different time-lapses depending on the intensity of the action. For example, using a .5s interval for a packing timelapse but a 5 or 10s interval for a sunset with moving clouds.

During post processing you can import this series of photos in order to turn it into a video. GoPro’s Studio software makes it as easy as possible.

 

Quick Shooting Tips

1)   If you’re not using a tray and handles, make sure your finger isn’t covering the lens!  Yes, I know this from personal experience.

2)   We all love macro, however your GoPro Hero 3+ will only deliver a sharp image if 12 inches or further from the subject. To get closer, check out the PolarPro Macro & Red Switchblade Filter.

3)   Try to hold the camera as steady as possible. Sharp movement, shaking and vibration in your video will make even hearty sailors seasick. Make sure to be slow and smooth when panning the camera.

 

What’s next?

All photographers and videographers develop their own personal styles over time. These will lead divers to some of the best underwater photo destinations while also requiring different accessories. Bluewater Photo has listed some of these GoPro underwater video accessories to help you take it to the next level.

 

Most of all, stay aware while diving and have fun!

 

 

Swimming with Blue Sharks & Mako Sharks by Scott Gietler. Filmed with GoPro Hero 3+

 

Manatees at Crystal River by Brent Durand. Filmed with GoPro Hero 3

Manatees at Crystal River Florida from Bluewater Travel.

 

 

Featured Reviews

 

Featured Tutorials

 

 

About the Author

Best of Southeast Asia

Brent Durand is an avid California beach diver, photographer and writer dedicated to capturing unique underwater, ocean lifestyle and adventure images. Brent is editor of the Underwater Photography Guide. Make sure to follow UWPG on Facebook for updates on everything underwater-photography.

 

 

Where to Buy

Please support the Underwater Photography Guide by purchasing your underwater photography gear through our sister site, Bluewater Photo & Video. Click, or call them at (310) 633-5052 for expert advice!


 

 
 
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Tips to Capture Amazing Freshwater Images

Eiko Jones
Expand Your Portfolio with these Tips for Shooting in Rivers, Lakes & Streams

 

Tips to Capture Amazing Freshwater Images

Expand Your Portfolio with these Tips for Shooting in Rivers, Lakes & Streams

Text and Photos By Eiko Jones

 

Coho Salmon smolts with reflections of sedge in the estuary of the Campbell River.

 
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Finding hidden gems in freshwater locations can be easier than you would think. Fresh water diving is considered by many to be less exciting and glamorous than ocean diving. Nevertheless, there are some amazing experiences to be had and a great many beautiful photo opportunities waiting for you in your local stream, lake or even swamp. You just have to be willing to try new places and literally go with the flow. Floating down a river is an experience akin to flying.

Here are a few tips and tricks to keep in mind when considering grabbing your camera and heading into a fresh water environment.

 

Safety First

If you are going into a river or even a small stream, be very aware of the incredible force of moving water. Even knee-deep water that appears to be moving slowly makes it difficult to maintain your position once submerged. Because of this, you must be prepared to go with the flow instead of fighting to stay put. Before any shoot, an initial recon of the stream is essential so that you are aware of obstructions and other hazards.

Trying to keep hold of a big camera system in moving water is very taxing, so be prepared for a work out. It’s a good idea to adjust camera settings before you start moving so that you can shoot as you drift, since you might not have time to do this when a photo opportunity presents itself. The rewards are worth the effort though.

 

Pink salmon otherwise known as a Humpy heading upstream in the Quinsam River.

 

Coho salmon male showing off spawning colours in the Quinsam River.

 

 

Even in flowing water there is a lot of accumulated detritus

In swamps and lakes this can be a difficult thing for photographers to manage. The slightest hand movement can send a cloud of fine silt up and destroy the shot you were just about to take. Use proper buoyancy and move forward very slowly so you don’t have to make rapid movements to stop. Even in water 2-4 feet deep I often use Scuba gear so I can be down on the bottom and avoid duck diving down to compose shots.

 

Tadpoles streaming through submerged logs at the margin of a lake.

 

Sunlight streaming through the trees highlights the lilies in this shallow pond.

 

Plan for abundant ambient light

Because a lot of fresh water diving is in shallow water, there is usually an abundant amount of light. Use this to your advantage by looking for dramatic scenes that highlight the sun streaming into the water. The use of high shutter speeds and small apertures in brightly lit water means you will have to crank up your strobes to near max power if you want to light up the underneath of lily pads and such. Or switch off the strobes and capture the subtleties of the sunlight filtering down through the vegetation or into the depths.

 

Lilies highlighted by sun and strobe lit for detail.

 

Canyon depths lit by sunlight streaming through the surface.

 

A shallow river is a great place to work on split-shots

By lying on your stomach and resting your elbows on the bottom, you can concentrate on getting that perfect split-spot. A large glass dome is preferable as it is more durable in the rough and tumble environment and also makes for a finer transition between sky and water. Lighting the underwater half is also easier in a shallow, brightly lit river. Lastly, by lying in one spot and setting up a nice composition, you just have to wait for the fish to swim close by the dome instead of swimming around trying to chase the fish.

 

Chum Salmon pair hanging out in the spawning beds of a small shallow stream.

 

Pink Salmon split shot. Taken while over a million fish were migrating up the Quinsam River in 2013.

 

Freshwater bodies vary more from season to season than the ocean

So consider returning to that magical spot you found one summer in the middle of winter or in the spring when all the new growth is emerging. Sometimes the change is so great it feels like diving in a new location. Fish like salmon and trout also are in the river system in their various forms throughout the year.

 

Yellow water lily emerging from the muddy bottom of a shallow pond that completely clogs up after spring.

 

Coho Salmon smolts that spend their first year in the river system before heading out to sea to grow and mature.

 

One response I receive a lot when people view my images from the local watershed is amazement at what lies beneath the surface of some benign-looking waterways. The appreciation for the entire ecosystem you get from spending time in freshwater is immense, and if you can bring a little bit of this to others through beautiful images then that is worth the effort. 

 

About the Author

While growing up in New Zealand, Eiko Jones acquired his first SLR camera at the age of fourteen. He quickly discovered his passion for capturing images of in their natural habitat. Whether exploring the ocean or alternate bodies of water, such as marshes and rivers, Eiko has developed a dramatic style in which he celebrates the corners of our world that are seldom seen. www.eikojonesphotography.com

 

Further Reading

 


Where to Buy

Please support the Underwater Photography Guide by purchasing your underwater photography gear through our sister site, Bluewater Photo & Video. Click, or call them at (310) 633-5052 for expert advice!


 

 
 
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Take Your Photography to the Next Level

Brent Durand
3 Essential Camera Settings for Shooting Underwater

 

Take Your Photography to the Next Level

3 Essential Camera Settings for Shooting Underwater

Text and Photos By Brent Durand

 

 

 
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Underwater photography is an activity where the learning never stops. It’s a daunting task to begin understanding camera and shooting basics, and those that stick with it will learn to apply the skills needed to capture underwater photos. But what’s next on the learning curve once you reach this first plateau? How do we progress from taking snapshots to creating images that convey our feelings when viewing a reefscape, depicting subtle marine life behavior or creating abstract art?

Different photographers will have different interests, leading them to focus on any number of specialties in u/w photography. Regardless of where these specialties take you, all will require a more advanced understanding of your camera and how use of specific features can help capture the perfect shot. Below are three of those advanced setting tips.

 

Shoot in Manual Mode

Precise creative control is achieved by limiting variables. We eliminate these variables by manually controlling our exposure, depth of field and other settings. This is done by setting the camera's shutter speed, aperture and ISO. Once you start shooting in manual it will become second nature.

That said, there are two notable exceptions. The first is using auto white balance. DSLR, Mirrorless and many new compact cameras have very good auto white balance capabilities when using strobes. Some subjects will throw it off, but if you’re shooting in RAW you will be able to compensate with small adjustments during post processing. The second exception to the manual rule is using TTL strobe exposure. Your camera settings will determine the ambient light entering the camera and the depth of field – you always want full control here. By using TTL with your strobes, you’re letting the camera choose strobe power and exposure of the scene (macro) or exposure of the primary subject/foreground (wide-angle). TTL is very good these days and getting more accurate, especially for shooting macro.

 

Precise control of camera settings creates a sense of momvent in this juvenile sweetlips.

 

A manatee looks beyond my dome port in ambient light.

 

Use Your Histogram

How do you know if you’re capturing a proper exposure? It’s dark underwater and the camera’s LCD screen can be deceptive, making images appear brighter than they actually are. A great example is when your mobile phone screen dims in low light. You can see it well in the dark but if you took it into regular/bright light the screen would be too dark to see.

The true measure of brightness is indicated in the histogram, which is easily accessed by pushing the Info button when reviewing images. If the curve of the histogram stacks against the right side, your photo is overexposed. If the curve stacks against the left side, your photo is underexposed. An ideal exposure lies in between these white and black points.

The more you use the histogram the more you'll be able to recognize contrast and dynamic range in a scene. Advanced shooters take these factors into consideration before firing a single shot, and there's no better way to begin "seeing" these qualities than learning from the histrogram as you shoot and edit images.

 

Black water contrasts white sea pen polyps as a porcelain crab looks out into the water column.

 

A sea lion pup eager to continue playing inside a cavern at Los Islotes.

 

Select your Autofocus Point

Most advanced compacts and all mirrorless and DSLR cameras will let you select between autofocus points. Every photographer has images that are well composed and exposed but simply lack focus on the important part of the scene: eyes, rhinophores, foreground subject, etc.

Your camera often can’t recognize these important focal points (whether shooting photo or video) when using the general autofocus zones, so you need to tell it where to focus using two steps. First, select a single autofocus point or a tight group of points. Second, move that focus point to the important part of the frame. This will guarantee sharp focus on the important part of the scene whether shooting 1 or 10 images of the subject, and is often easier than the “focus and recompose” method using AF-Lock.

 

A connection with this network pipefish is established through a combination of sharp focus on the eyes and shallow depth of field.

 

Scorpionfish portrait.

 

Conclusion

An intimate knowledge of your camera and the best underwater photography settings is essential for capturing great images. By utilizing the three settings above you’ll by ready to take your photography to the next level. All that's left is to practice, practice, practice.

 

 

About the Author

Best of Southeast Asia

Brent Durand is an avid California beach diver, photographer and writer dedicated to capturing unique underwater, ocean lifestyle and adventure images. Brent is editor of the Underwater Photography Guide. Make sure to follow UWPG on Facebook for updates on everything underwater-photography.

 

 

Further Reading

 


Where to Buy

Please support the Underwater Photography Guide by purchasing your underwater photography gear through our sister site, Bluewater Photo & Video. Click, or call them at (310) 633-5052 for expert advice!


 

 
 
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Pelagic Fish Photography

Craig Dietrich
Tips to Capture Incredible Schooling Fish Photos

 

Pelagic Fish Photography


Tips to Capture Incredible Schooling Fish Photos

Text and Photos By Craig Dietrich

 

Pelagic Fish School Photography

 

 
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What’s a pelagic school of fish? The term “pelagic” refers to fish that live neither close to the bottom (called “demersal” fish), nor close to the surface, nor on a reef. They are the fish that we see at open water dive sites subject to currents and chance encounters with large marine life.

We are all familiar with and in awe of the sheer vastness of the oceans. Approximately 98% of the world’s total water volume is below 330 feet (100 meters) - a vast expanse that makes up the largest aquatic habitat on earth. The open ocean is a home to pelagic fish that comprise approximately 11% of all known fish species.

The range of pelagic fish is almost (but not quite) as vast as the oceans.  Pelagics range from small coastal forage fish such as sardines and herring to larger fish like swordfish and tuna, along with apex predators like oceanic sharks. Regardless of size, they are generally agile swimmers and have streamlined bodies. Many pelagics that live above 660 feet (approx. 200 meters and referred to as epipelagic), have a silvery appearance that almost gives the fish a transparent quality that helps in their survival. Pelagics are always on the move, constantly swimming and following food or water temperatures.

So how do we find these oceanic wanderers and bring some amazing images of them back to land?

 

Pelagic Fish School Photography

This school of Bigeye Trevallies show off the silvery countershade many pelagics have. A sunburst and diagonal lines add energy to the image.

 

Photo Gear

A wide-angle setup is the way to go for pelagic fish schools. When shooting a DSLR with a crop sensor, my go-to lens is the Tokina 10-17.  I almost always have the lens set at 10mm to get the 180 degrees of coverage that setting offers, and I’ve had great results. When using a DSLR full frame camera, there are a few different options. The lens I recommend is the Sigma 15mm, which can be used with Canon or Nikon bodies and has received applause from users and reviewers alike, many who believe it’s a better lens than those made by than their Canon or Nikon counterparts due to it’s ability to focus closer. With any other type of system, the widest lens/dome combo or wet lens available for the system is recommended. Read more on the best wide-angle lenses.

Now that we have the right gear, let’s move on to settings. Shutter speed controls the darkness/lightness of the background of the image, so it can have a huge effect on the final product. The shutter speed you choose may vary depending on whether your pelagic subject is moving (i.e. fast school of fish) or more still (i.e. school of jacks).  For slow-moving or still pelagic fish, a slow shutter speed (1/125 on a DSLR) is favored. This allows more natural light into the camera, which shows the pelagic’s true environment instead of just a dark background. When shooting a fast-moving subject, I’m more likely to shoot closer to 1/200 (or 1/250 depending on strobe sync speed) to let in less background light and give a more dramatic effect to the image.

Another important setting to consider when shooting pelagics is the F-stop (aka aperture). As the F-stop increases, the light coming through the lens decreases.  Whenever conditions allow, I like to use the sun as a backlight when shooting pelagics.  This means that I need to stop down to F16 or above, receiving added depth of field as a bonus. If shooting away from the sun, I use a smaller aperture in the F8-F13 range. I always recommend two strobes (a single strobe isn’t powerful enough to cover the area when shooting wide angle). Two strobes take care of filling in the foreground, while natural light to illuminates the background.

 

Pelagic Fish School Photography

Pelagic schools of fish often swim in tower-like formations, making great vertical images.

 

Shooting Tips

 

Know Your Camera Gear

Learn what your particular system can do, and more importantly, what it can’t do.  Practice the controls on the housing so much there will never be a question whether you are pressing the right button or turning the wrong dial. Think of your camera as another piece of dive equipment - learn it and treat it with the same respect.

 

Ease Your Way In

When you see the school of pelagic fish, don’t race to get to them. If that’s the approach taken, chances are by the time you reach them...well, you won’t reach them because they will be gone. Breathe and gather your thoughts. You may be in awe of the beauty and graceful movement of the school, but think. See the shot in your mind. A slow, easy approach will make a better image...because the subject will actually be in the image.

 

Use the Manual Settings Instead of the TTL Settings

When shooting wide, it’s not wise to depend on TTL settings to make your images great, as TTL is not as reliable as for macro with more static subjects. I always recommend shooting with manual settings.

 

The Most Important Tip:  Take Chances!

I’ve met so many people who are intent on “just getting a shot”. I tell my students to use their imagination, to try different settings and really think outside of their comfort zone.  Photography is an art. A little experimentation with angles, with different settings or composition is a good thing!  When you can let go of the pressure of “just getting a shot”, you may end up getting THE shot.

 

Pelagic Fish School Photography

A school of trevallies swims together in the open ocean off the Socorro Islands.

 

 

Want to dive in Socorro with huge schools of pelagic fish, mantas, whales and more?  

Check out UWPG's Socorro underwater photography workshop in March 2015.

 

 

About the Author

Craig Dietrich is a former Naval and family/children’s photographer.  An avid scuba diver, his two loves of diving and photography came together and now Craig is based out of Pompano Beach, Florida.  View more of Craig’s work at www.dietrichunderwater.com.

 

Further Reading

 


Where to Buy

Please support the Underwater Photography Guide by purchasing your underwater photography gear through our sister site, Bluewater Photo & Video. Click, or call them at (310) 633-5052 for expert advice!


 

 
 
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A Photographer's Guide to Muck Diving

Mike Bartick
The Essentials of Muck Dive Photography

 

A Photographer's Guide to Muck Diving


The Essentials of Muck Dive Photography

Text and Photos By Mike Bartick

 

 

 
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The scuba industry has coined the phrase “Muck Diving” to describe a style of diving or a location. Most of these muck dive sites/locations share many of the same characteristics worldwide and should be approached differently than their reef or open water counterparts.

Muck sites are often delicate estuary-type habitats that support very small creatures that settle as post-developed larvae to spend their entire lives on the open sand flats. With very little in the way of protection, these highly adapted critters find quick shelters under the sand or in rubbish, discarded household goods, in algae or any other protective objects. Shooting images of these critters will pose many challenges to new and experienced photographers alike.

 

Jawfish egg detail.

 

Exceptional images are created by the photographer as a result of his or her skills, regardless of whether the camera is a compact, Micro 4/3 or DSLR. It is entirely up to the photographer to create a compelling image. Like golf, shooting images underwater is all in the approach, and the end result depends heavily on how the setup is performed.

Talking about shooting is the easy part - the reality is that everything underwater is moving and oftentimes doesn’t want to cooperate. Sometimes the creatures aren’t in the right position or the action is happening to fast to capture. For this I always encourage a large helping of patience and observation. Watching the behavior will give you better insight on how to capture that special image and how to anticipate capturing it.

Below are my 5 tips on preparation for muck diving and 5 tips on photo design and composition.

 

Imperial shrimp and prey.

 

Preparation

 

  • Minimize shooting variables before you get wet. Preset your ISO. I shoot at the lowest ISO setting possible for better noise control. Set your shutter speed and strobe setting in anticipation of your subject before jumping in. Streamline your dive kit and think simple. The last thing you want is to be distracted by your camera and kick up silt on the muck bottom.
  • Familiarize yourself with the mechanics of your camera and its functions. I prefer to use the spot focus indicator in the viewfinder to create better compositions.
  • Concentrate on your technique underwater. How you approach your subject, holding your camera, composing images and even strobe angle should all be considered technique.
  • Select the right lens for the subjects you anticipate finding on muck dives. Palm-sized critters and larger are best shot with a 60mm lens. Subjects smaller than palm-size require a 100/105mm lens.

 

In addition, getting to know the basic anatomy of your subject is a reliable way to nailing your shots. Examples include knowing where the eyes are located on a tiger shrimp, how a boxer crab really behaves and preparing ideas for photographing a hairy frogfish. Learning these traits is best performed before the trip so that you have ample time to prepare.   

 

Hairy shrimp.

 

Photo Design and Composition

 

  • Filling the frame with your subject is essential for true 1:1 macro or greater. Get close to your subject and minimize the water between the lens port and the subject. Look for natural flow. Pay attention to the direction your subject is facing and how it is positioned. Creating a natural flow within the frame increases the WOW factor, elevating an ID book image to a real photo.
  • The rule of thirds is the most basic but reliable composition method for all art and photography. Visual balance is achieved by anchoring your subject to the intersecting lines of a Tic-Tac-Toe grid, which happens to be about 1/3 of the way into the frame. Grid overlays in your Lightroom settings are available and will help you understand this process a bit more, teaching you how to apply it when shooting the image. See more on this in the guide to underwater compositions.
  • Be patient. Try to capture the essence of the action by being patient. When your critter is first approached it will be in fear of being eaten (by you), so stay calm and allow it to get used to your presence. Once it becomes more comfortable and goes back to natural behaviors is the time to try to capture a photo. A subtle movement or a Frogfish’s profound yawn can make your image special and stand out from the rest.
  • Contrast. Always consider the entire frame, because sometimes what isn’t in the image is as important as what is. Negative space adds natural contrast. Shallow f-stops will bokeh the reef or whip coral in the background.
  • Break out. Try something new on each trip. Try shooting super macro, using a snoot or a new lens. Take the time to Break Out from your old habits and do something new and daring, like using manual power on your strobes - go crazy!

 

Pink sided flasher wrasse.

 

Lenses for Muck Diving

 

Muck diving is all about macro images, which need to be shot with dedicated macro lenses. Prime lenses are the best choice because they yield sharper images with better contrast.

For Canon and Nikon users, the 60mm, 100mm or 105mm will be the natural lenses to select. Yes there are other choices, but I will refrain from expanding. So what’s the difference? Each of these lenses has the exact same reproduction ratio maximum of 1:1, but operates at a different focal length.

 

60mm Macro Lens

A 60mm lens is versatile - great for night diving and low light situations and as well as close, tight macro. They are often regarded as a workhorse lens for basic, effective macro photography.

  • Operate with a very short working distance; lens to subject is only a few inches.
  • Great Bokeh, sharpness and versatility.
  • Target selection: Subjects palm-sized and larger.
  • Teleconverters: An inexpensive way to increase magnification. Note that using a TC will increase your working distance slightly.
  • Diopters: Not recommended but can be used in a pinch

 

Bobtail squid shot with 60mm macro lens.

 

100mm (Canon) or 105mm (Nikkor) Macro Lenses

These are more specialized lenses best suited to animal behavior, fish photography and super macro (with diopters).

  • Narrowed angle of view and more magnification makes it easier to fill the frame.
  • Exceptional Bokeh, sharpness and contrast.
  • Target selection: Palm-sized to fingernail-sized critters.
  • Teleconverters: Great for shooting fish with eggs and increasing magnification at a slightly greater working distance.
  • Diopters: Highly recommended. SubSee, Nauticam, Inon, Saga and Bluewater all make these wet lens attachments. They all work with a variety of results depending on camera gear.
  • Diopters decrease the working distance and dramatically increase your reproduction ration. Target selection is reserved for the very small as the DOF is extremely narrow and can limit the users’ compositions to head-on or profile images.

 

Brooding cardinalfish shot with 100mm macro lens.

 

When preparing for your next muck dive, whether a dedicated trip or single dive site, be sure to do your homework and be prepared - you never know when that once in a lifetime opportunity will arise. Being ready for that moment will make all the difference.

Now get out there and have a muck diving adventure!

 

Dwarf goby.

 

 

Join Mike on a muck diving & photo adventure in world-famous Lembeh Strait.
June 3-14, 2014 at Kasawari.

Kasawari Lembeh Workshop

 

 

About the Author

Mike BartikMike Bartick is an avid and experienced scuba diver and Marine Wildlife Photographer. He has an insatiable love for nudibranchs, frogfish and other underwater critters, and is the official critter expert for the Underwater Photography Guide. Mike is also one of the UWPG trip leaders. See more of his work at www.saltwaterphoto.com.

 

 

Further Reading

 


Where to Buy

Please support the Underwater Photography Guide by purchasing your underwater photography gear through our sister site, Bluewater Photo & Video. Click, or call them at (310) 633-5052 for expert advice!


 

 
 
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